Winner of the 2020 Conflict Research Society Book of the Year Prize

Posted by: Emma Wink Tags: There is no tags | Categories: Current News

May
26

The Conflict Research Society congratulates Pamina Firchow on winning the 2020 Conflict Research Society Book of the Year Prize for her book titled Reclaiming Everyday peace: Local Voices in Measurement and Evaluation After War published by Cambridge University Press (2018).


Reclaiming Everyday Peace addresses the effectiveness and impact of local level interventions on communities affected by war. Using an innovative methodology to generate participatory numbers, Pamina Firchow finds that communities saturated with external interventions after war do not have substantive higher levels of peacefulness according to community-defined indicators of peace than those with lower levels of interventions. These findings suggest that current international peacebuilding efforts are not very effective at achieving peace by local standards because disproportionate attention is paid to reconstruction, governance and development assistance with little attention paid to community ties and healing. Firchow argues that a more bottom up approach to measuring the effectiveness of peacebuilding is required. By finding ways to effectively communicate local community needs and priorities to the international community, efforts to create an atmosphere for an enduring peace are possible.

The prize committee received over 50 nominations from conflict/peace researchers, institutions, practitioners and publishers from around the world. The committee chose the winning title out of 6 short-listed books based on criteria such as how well the book demonstrates a significant contribution to conflict/peace studies, impact factor, methodological rigour, robustness and credibility of the findings, the extent to which it is interdisciplinary, quality of writing and presentation. 

Judges on the Prize Committee praised Reclaiming Everyday Peace: Local Voices in Measurement and Evaluation After War for its “elegant and simple solution” to the complex problems associated with evaluating everyday peace. The judges highlighted that “this book offers a deep, nuanced treatment of peace as concept, and as lived experience”.  It offered a very “creative and systematic approach” with extensive fieldwork and “methodological innovation”, incorporating consideration of “players in different levels of peacebuilding efforts”. The judges also praised this book for its “radical” policy relevance: “If we accept what Firchow is saying, then the implication is that the existing ‘liberal’ peacebuilding paradigm needs to be flipped inside-out.

This title was elected out of a total of six finalists. These were excellent contenders for the prize and the judges also praised the excellent quality of research in all of the shortlisted books.  Our congratulations are extended to the following running up shortlisted titles (in no particular order):

Campbell, Susana 2019. Global Governance and Local Peace: Accountability and Performance in International Peacebuilding. Cambridge University Press.

Abdi, D.I. and Mason, S.J., 2019. Mediation and Governance in Fragile Contexts: Small Steps to Peace. Lynne Rienner Publishers.

Caplan, R., 2019. Measuring Peace: Principles, Practices, and Politics. Oxford University Press

Mironova, V., 2019. From Freedom Fighters to Jihadists: Human Resources of Non-State Armed Groups. Oxford University Press. 

Weidmann, N.B. and Rød, E.G., 2019. The Internet and political protest in autocracies. Oxford University Press. 

Thank you also to the CRS Book Prize Judges – Christine Cheng, Isabel Phillips, Govinda Clayton, Robert Nagel, Catalina Montoya, and Andrew Thomson (facilitator).

Due to Covid-19, this year’s CRS conference has been postponed until 26th and 27th of August, 2021. 

The winner of this year’s CRS Book Prize, Pamina Firchow, will provide a keynote talk to CRS members on a CRS online event on 24th September, 3:00pm to 4:30pm.


Sign up for the keynote talk

HOW DO I NOMINATE A BOOK FOR THE CRS BOOK PRIZE?

The annual book prize nomination period opens each year in October. A call for nominations is sent out in October via email to all CRS members, the board, as well as a variety of leading scholars and institutions from around the world. The deadline for making nominations is the last day in November.  Winners are normally selected by end of January.  However, you can make nominations outside of the nomination timeframe window by emailing Andrew Thomson a.f.thomson@qub.ac.uk

Postponement of the 2020 annual CRS Conference

Posted by: Emma Wink Tags: There is no tags | Categories: Current News, Uncategorised

May
9

It is with a heavy heart that we announce the postponement of the 2020 Annual Conflict Research Society Conference. The Belfast conference will now instead take place on August 26-27, 2021.

The health and safety of CRS members is our greatest priority. The CRS conference team and governing council have diligently monitored the evolving situation over the past weeks, and have concluded that the situation remains too fluid and rapidly changing to realistically plan for a large event with more than 200 attendees this autumn. Therefore, after weighing up the merits of different approaches, the council determined that the early postponement of the Annual Conference until 2021 is in our members’ best interests.

We are however very excited to inform you that on the week the conference was due to be held we will instead be offering a series of online events. These will be free for all CRS members. This will include webinars featuring the winner of this year’s CRS book prize, the winner of the Cedric Smith prize, and a roundtable on the implications of COVID-19 for peace and conflict research and practice. The CRS Team will provide you with further details very soon.

If you have any questions please email the conference directors, Robert U. Nagel and Marina G. Petrova, crsconf@gmail.com.

Thank you for your understanding and support.

Marina G. Petrova – CRS Conference Director
Robert U. Nagel – CRS Conference Director
Annekatrin Deglow – CRS Programme Chair
Andrew Thomson – CRS Local Conference Organiser
Govinda Clayton – CRS Strategic Director
Hugh Miall – CRS Chair

CRS Statement Regarding COVID-19

Posted by: Emma Wink Tags: There is no tags | Categories: Current News

March
27

The Conflict Research Society is closely monitoring the situation regarding the recent COVID-19 outbreak. The health and safety of CRS members is always our utmost priority. We have therefore postponed our annual AGM and are in regular discussions about all future events.

The CRS 2020 Annual Conference is still months away, but we will be keeping you continuously informed about any developments and decisions along the way.

The programme team is currently reviewing all proposals and building the CRS 2020 Annual Conference Programme. We will inform you about the outcome of your proposals soon.

We expect that registration for attending the CRS 2020 Annual Conference will be significantly extended to allow our CRS members to assess the situation before making the decision to attend. The cancellation policy will also likely be relaxed to reflect the constantly evolving situation. The CRS Team will provide you with further details as soon as we have them.

If you have any questions please email the conference organisers, Robert Nagel and Marina G. Petrova, crsconf@gmail.com.

Thanks for your patience and understanding

Marina G. Petrova – CRS Conference Director
Robert Nagel – – CRS Conference Director
Annekatrin Deglow – CRS Programme Chair
Govinda Clayton – CRS Strategic Director
Hugh Miall – CRS Chair

2019 Cedric Smith Prize Winner

Posted by: Tamsin Tags: There is no tags | Categories: Current News

August
21

The Conflict Research Society congratulates Robert Ulrich Nagel, winner of the Cedric Smith Prize 2019. Robert received his PhD from the University of Kent in May 2019 and is currently an adjunct professor at Clark University.

The Cedric Smith Prize is awarded annually to the best research paper in peace and conflict research by a PhD student.

Robert’s winning article “Sexual violence and conflict recurrence” shows that sexual violence perpetrated after conflict is associated with a high likelihood of conflict recurrence. Building on research that shows an association between recruitment and rape as a socialization method during war, Robert argues that when rebels perpetrate sexual violence in inactive periods, it indicates ongoing mobilization efforts. The implications of this argument for the risk of conflict recurrence are tested on a global dataset of post-conflict years from 1989 and 2015. The jury was impressed by the overall high quality of this submission, including a strong review of and embeddedness in previous research, a compelling and well-founded theoretical argument, sophisticated statistical analysis, and clarity in writing. The jury also appreciated the author’s reflections on the notion and category of “post-conflict” if one or both sides continue to mobilize and perpetrate sexual violence after the fighting stops. Where Robert’s research really stands out, however, is with regard to the implications for policy – a point that the jury attaches particular importance to when selecting the winner of the prize. While there is a profound normative argument to prevent and battle sexual violence, the knowledge that sexual violence can be an early warning sign of impending conflict recurrence presents an additional security-based incentive to pay more attention to these human rights abuses during peacetime.

The CRS received 10 excellent submissions for the prize, and the winner was selected by an international jury consisting of Nadine Ansorg (University of Kent), Jonathan Pinckney (Norwegian University of Science and Technology), and Corinne Bara (Uppsala University, Chair of the Jury).

2018 Cedric Smith Prize Winners

Posted by: Tamsin Tags: There is no tags | Categories: Current News

September
13

The Conflict Research Society congratulates Philipp Schulz and Margherita Belgioioso, winners of the Cedric Smith Prize 2018. Philipp received his PhD from Ulster University in December 2017 and is now a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Bremen in Germany. Margherita received her PhD from the University of Essex in March 2018 and is currently a Lecturer in International Relations at Brunel University London.

The Cedric Smith Prize is awarded annually to the best research paper in peace and conflict research by a UK or ROI based PhD student. This year, the CRS decided to honour the exceptionally high quality of submissions by awarding two prizes.

Belgioioso’s winning article “Going Underground: Resort to Terrorism in Mass Mobilization Dissident Campaigns” is published in the Journal of Peace Research. While most previous research studies the use of terrorist tactics in civil wars and (previously nonviolent) mass civil resistance movements separately, Margherita Belgioioso bridges this division and finds that groups involved in either face similar organizational pressures, which encourage the initiation of terrorism due to higher tactical effectiveness. Specifically, leaders of organizations that participate in mass dissident campaigns decide to initiate terrorist campaigns with the aim of preserving the commitment of their followers and as a strategy of outbidding. The jury was particularly impressed by the sophisticated and creative theorizing in this piece: Belgioioso draws on and integrates scholarship on social movements, civil wars, and terrorism. The article also stands out for the clarity of argument and the rigorous empirical analysis. In addition, the author offers a new dataset on terrorism occurrence in 189 mass dissident campaigns between 1948 and 2006, which in itself is a contribution to the academic community and permits further research on this topic. In terms of policy implications, Margherita’s work offers us important information on the conditions under which we should expect more terrorist attacks by groups involved in mass dissident campaigns.

Schulz’ winning article “Displacement from Gendered Personhood – Sexual Violence andMasculinities in Northern Uganda” is published in International Affairs. While most existing studies on the topic treat the effects of sexual violence as linked to one-off events, Philipp Schulz builds on seven months of fieldwork in northern Uganda to show how the impact of sexual violence is a process that is compounded over time and strikes at multiple levels of what it means to be a man. The contribution of this research goes beyond the scholarship on wartime sexual violence against men: By critically challenging the dominant terminologies in his field, Philipp is able to offer a lens that can help us understand the impact of sexual violence on male, female and gender non-confirming survivors. The jury was very impressed by the reflective, ethical and conscientious way this research was conducted in a very challenging setting, as well as the careful treatment of concepts and nuanced argument. For policy and practice, the findings of this study offer some hope: Acknowledging that the aftermath of experiencing sexual violence plays out in the long term also acknowledges that effects on gendered identity are potentially temporal and can possibly be alleviated. By amplifying the seldom-heard voices of male survivors, the paper contributes to an understanding of how they could be assisted in this process.

The CRS received 12 excellent submissions for the prize, and the winner was selected by an international jury consisting of Hugh Miall (University of Kent), Enzo Nussio (ETH Zurich), Johanna Söderström (Uppsala University), and Corinne Bara (Uppsala University, Chair of the Jury).

Winner of 2018 Conflict Research Society Book of the Year Prize

Posted by: Tamsin Tags: There is no tags | Categories: Current News

May
2

The Conflict Research Society congratulates Ana Arjona on winning the 2018 Conflict Research Society Book of the Year Prize for her book titled Rebelocracy: Social Order in the Colombian Civil War published by Cambridge University Press (November, 2016).

The prize committee received over 40 nominations from conflict/peace researchers, institutions, practitioners and publishers from around the world. The committee chose the winning title out of 4 short-listed books based on criteria such as how well the book demonstrates a significant contribution to conflict/peace studies, impact factor, methodological rigour, robustness and credibility of the findings, the extent to which it is interdisciplinary, quality of writing and presentation. The committee also prioritized first time book authors.

Judges on the prize committee described Rebelocracy: Social Order in the Colombian Civil War as a “truly innovative and a unique study.” They praised the way this study “shed light on another under-explored area that of social order during civil wars, non-state actor governance, and the dynamics of combatant-civilian interaction.” Judges highlighted the “meticulous” approach “in terms of the question it asks, the theroetical innovation, and the methods used.” Pointing to the “theoretical contribution and substantial potential to influence practice,” the judges agreed this book is a deserved winner for its outstanding scholarship.

This year’s prize committee chose this year’s winner out of four short-listed excellent books. Our congratulations are extended to the following running up titles (in no particular order):

Kaplan, Oliver. Resisting War: How Communities Protect Themselves. Cambridge University Press (July 20, 2017)

Balcells, Laia. Rivalry and Revenge: the Politics of Violence during Civil War CUP, 2017.

Matanock, Alia. Electing Peace: From Civil Conflict to Political Participation. Cambridge University Press, 2017

Two other excellent books only just missed the short-list. We would like to also give these books an honourable mention to:

Ramsbotham, Oliver. When Conflict Resolution Fails, Polity Press, 2016

Dara Kay Cohen Rape during Civil War Cornell University Press, 2016

Thank you also to the CRS Book Prize Judges -, Isabel Phillips, Govinda Clayton, Judith Large, Kyle Beardsley, Sabrina Karim, and Andrew Thomson (facilitator).

The winner of this year’s CRS Book Prize, Ana Arjona, is invited to the CRS annual conference to receive her prize and to provide a short presentation on her work. This year the CRS conference will be held at University of Birmingham on the September 17-18, 2018. It is titled “Rethinking the Transition from Violence to Peace in Uncertain Times”.